Plants

Red Mangroves – Rhizophora mangle – at Barkers, West Bay, Grand Cayman. Photo: Ann Stafford, Oct.22, 2006

Red Mangroves puzzle on TheJigsawPuzzles.com

Red Mangroves puzzle on TheJigsawPuzzles.com

Red Mangroves jigsaw puzzle – click on the thumbnail. Red Mangroves – Rhizophora mangle at Barkers, Grand Cayman.

Cayman Islands Native (Indigenous) Species Definition

A Cayman Islands native species is one that occurs naturally in the Cayman Islands without direct or indirect human actions.Some plants and animals are native to only one or two of the three Cayman Islands.

Some plants & animals have been introduced & become naturalized, they survive in the wild. If they are not native (indigenous), they will be noted as naturalized.

Cayman common names are almost always different from those used for the same plant when it occurs in other countries.

Fruit – could be a berry (many seeds), drupe (one central stony seed), capsule, pod etc. It does not necessarily mean an edible fruit for humans, but may be for birds

MINI-WOODLANDS  compiled by Ann Stafford

Correction: Ironwood – Chionanthus caymanensis is in the OLEACEAE family (not OLACACEAE)

Click here  Mini-Woodlands common names A-Z Sept. 28, 2005

Cayman common names usually differ from those elsewhere.

Click here Mini-Woodlands scientific names A-Z Sept.28, 2005

Grand Cayman’s birds suffered very badly as a result of Hurricane Ivan (Sept.11-12, 2004) & its aftermath, when there was little food or shelter. The preservation & re-planting of Cayman’s indigenous (& a few that have become naturalized & grow in the wild) trees & shrubs, in clusters, rather than singly, will create a network of mini-woodlands to aid the re-establishment of bird populations. Listed are different species that provide suitable roosts & nesting sites & a year-round supply of fruits for BIRDS.

Click here to see CaymANNature Flora pictures – both photos and scanned Virtual Herbarium images in Ann Stafford’s Gallery. They are arranged by scientific name A – Z.  FLORA – Cayman Islands

and work-in-progress Cayman HERBARIUM

Duppy PumpkinCionosicyos pomiformis, Family: CUCURBITACEAE, Mastic Trail, Ann Stafford, Aug. 3, 2006. High climbing vine, fruits green with whitish bands when immature, turning yellow, then bright orange, when ripe. Range: Grand Cayman and Jamaica.

Duppy Pumpkin – Cionosicyos pomiformis, CUCURBITACEAE
Orange fruits on high-climbing vine.
Ann Stafford, Mastic Trail, Aug. 3, 2006

Cayman Casearia – Casearia staffordiae, Family: SALICACEAE
Grand Cayman endemic shrub, Critically Endangered, North Side Nov. 10, 2002. This species was first noticed on the Mastic Trail on June 22, 2001.

Cayman Casearia, Cayman Scolosanthus and Ratwood, three Cayman Islands shrubs with little leaves and no spines. Ann Stafford PIX, 2007.

Cayman Casearia and Cayman Scolsanthus could not be botanically described until flowers and fruits were found. This took several years. They were then determined by botanist Dr. George R. Proctor to be species new to science, Casearia staffordiae and Scolosanthus roulstonii. He named them after their discoverers P. Ann van B. Stafford and Frank E. Roulstone III, naturalists, in recognition of their efforts in conserving indigenous species.

Ann was looking for Rat Wood – Erythroxylum rotundifolium, on the Mastic Trail in June 2001. She thought she’d found it and photographed it, but it wasn’t Ratwood. She found tiny flowers on this rare plant that grows only in the Mastic region of Grand Cayman. In January 2005, Ann and friends eventually found little fruits. Dr. Proctor took a specimen to the United States National Herbarium at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Comparing it with close relatives of the genus Casearia, he determined that it was a previously undescribed species, a species new to science. He named it Casearia staffordiae. It is a very slow-growing Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic shrub.

KEW and OTEP – Cayman Islands

Kew, Royal Botanic Gardens and OTEP (UK Overseas Territories Environment Programme)CAYMAN ISLANDS

There are 415 species and varieties native to the Cayman Islands. Of these, 21 species of higher plants are known to be endemic with a further eight species representing endemic Caymanian varieties. Perhaps, the most important species are those that are endemic to a single island. Grand Cayman lays claim to the greatest number of endemic species: Hohenbergia caymanensis, Salvia caymanensis, Pisonia margaretae, Dendrophylax faucettii, Scolosanthus roulstonii, Casearia staffordiae, Agalinus kingsii and Aegiphyla caymanensis. Grand Cayman also has three endemic varieties: Pectis caymanensis var. robusta, Terminalia eriostachya var. margaretiae, and Myrmecophila thompsoniana var. thompsoniana. Cayman Brac has one endemic species, Verbesina caymanensis and two endemic varieties: Consolea millspaughii var. caymanensis and Epiphyllum phyllanthus var. plattsii. One endemic species is restricted to Little Cayman, Chamaesyce caymanensis. There are also three sister island endemic species (i.e. restricted to two of the Cayman Islands) and one endemic variety. In addition, twenty four species are considered near-endemic (i.e. native to the Caymans and one other island) and forty four are local regional (i.e. native the NW Caribbean region). The Cayman Islands are also home to ten Caribbean endemic genera; Leptocereus (1 sp.), Chascotheca (1 sp.), Picrodendron (1 sp.), Petitia (1 sp.), Dendropemon (2 spp.), Neoregnellia (1sp), Tolumnia (2 sp.), Margaritopsis (1 sp.), Scolosanthus (1 sp.) and Hypelate (1 sp.).

Casearia staffordiae Family SALICACEAE is on page 316 (and Plates 19 and 20) of FLORA of the CAYMAN ISLANDS by George R. Proctor, published by Royal Botanic Gardens, KEW, 2012 and Scolosanthus roulstonii Family: RUBIACAE is on page 620 (and Plate 61). The botanical description in Latin is included for both species.

FLORA of the Cayman Islands

The book is available from the National Trust for the Cayman Islands and local bookstores for CI$30.

Flora of the Cayman Islands 2012, Kew Books

Plant Science Bulletin 59 (3) 2013

Review of the FLORA of the CAYMAN ISLANDS 2nd. Edition 2012 by George R. Proctor, p.138-142, by -Lee B. Kass, L. H. Bailey Hortorium, Department of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA. lbk7@cornell.edu

Dr. George R. Proctor, author of the Flora of the Cayman Islands, by Mahogany tree - Swietenia mahagoni in West Bay.Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford, Grand Cayman, July 7, 2002

Dr. George R. Proctor, author of the Flora of the Cayman Islands, by Mahogany tree – Swietenia mahagoni in West Bay. Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford, Grand Cayman, July 7, 2002

Dr. Proctor on the Mastic Trail, Grand Cayman. Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford April 6, 2004.

Dr. Proctor, nearly 84 years old, with his specimen box, on the Mastic Trail, Grand Cayman. Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford April 6, 2004.

George Proctor Returns to Jamaica

The Plant Press Vol.2, No.3, October – November 1999.

Department of Botany and the U.S. National Herbarium

National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

George Proctor Returns to Jamaica p.6

Click on CaymANNature Flora album to see Cayman Islands Flora pictures – both photos and scanned Virtual Herbarium images in Ann Stafford’s Gallery. They are arranged by scientific name A – Z.

Click on Cayman Herbarium  for scanned Virtual Herbarium images in Ann Stafford’s Gallery, to help with identification, showing OPPOSITE or ALTERNATE leaf arrangement on the stem. They are arranged by scientific name A – Z. There are page and plate # references for FLORA of the CAYMAN ISLANDS by George R. Proctor, 2nd. Edition, 2012 and Wild Trees in the Cayman Islands by Fred Burton, illustrated by Penny Clifford, 2nd. Edition, 2007.

Click here for   Cayman Islands PLANTS Red List 2007

Sling-shot, Wild Jasmine – Tabernaemontana laurifolia L.

Tabernaemontana laurifolia fl. fr Dec7-05 AS

Sling-shot, Wild Jasmine – Tabernaemontana laurifolia L, Family: APOCYNACEAE, Cayman native tree – Endangered.
Shiny OPPOSITE leaves, white latex, distinctive branching, grows in dry, rocky woodlands.
Flowers greenish-yellow, fruit 2 broad, fleshy follicles, seeds embedded in orange arils.
Grand Cayman and Jamaica only. Photo: Ann Stafford, Dec. 7, 2005.

Click here for more pictures & information: Sling-shot, Wild Jasmine – Tabernaemontana laurifolia

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