1975 Royal Society – CI Gov. Little Cayman Expedition

Joint Royal Society and Cayman Islands Government Expedition to Little Cayman in 1975, when the island was little known scientifically.

Team of scientists:
D.R. Stoddart (Cambridge): geomorphology, leader
R.R. Askew (Manchester): entomology
A.W. Diamond (Nairobi): orthnithology
M.E.C. Giglioli (George Town): marine studies and liaison
M.V. Hounsome (Manchester) land fauna other than insects
G.W. Potts (Plymouth: marine ecology
G.R. Proctor (Kingston): botany
C. Woodruffe (Cambridge): Mangroves (part-time)

2015 is the 40th. Anniversary of the 1975 Little Cayman Expedition (July and August).

Atoll Research Bulletin
241. Geography and Ecology of Little Cayman
Edited by D.R. Stoddart and M.E.C. Giglioli
Issued by The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. U.S.A.
March, 1980

241. Geography and Ecology of Little Cayman

Caribbean Sea

Caribbean Sea

Little Cayman is the smallest of the three Cayman Islands, emergent sections of the Cayman Ridge along the northern margin of the Cayman Trench between the Sierra Maestra of Cuba and the coast of Belize. The Trench itself is 1700 km long, and has maximum depths south of the Cayman Islands of more than 6000 m. Little Cayman lies 230 km from Cabo Cruz, Cuba; the same distance from the nearest point of Jamaica; and 740 km from the mainland of Yucatan. The Caymans themselves are well separated from each other: Little Cayman is 117 km ENE from Grand Cayman, though only 7.5 km from Cayman Brac.

Cayman Islands

Cayman Islands

Little Cayman’s permanent population consisted of 18 people in 1975.

Little Cayman and Cayman Brac - the Sister Islands (Acorn Publishing Co Ltd 2013)

Little Cayman and Cayman Brac –                       the Sister Islands
(Acorn Publishing Co Ltd 2013)

David R. Stoddart (Cambridge): geomorphology, leader

David R. Stoddart

David R. Stoddart

Little Cayman Atoll Research Bulletin No.241 1980

Atoll Research Bulletin March 1980. No. 241. Geography and Ecology of Little Cayman.
Edited by D.R. Stoddart and M.E.C. Giglioli
Issued by the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA

Little Cayman Scientific Survey 1980

Marco E.C. Giglioli (George Town): marine studies and liaison

Marco Giglioli

Marco Giglioli

The Mosquito Research & Control Unit (MRCU) was established in 1965 when Marco Giglioli arrived from London with instructions ‘to establish a laboratory and conduct research with a view to advising the Cayman Government on suitable methods of control.’

Mosquito Research and Control Unit
Mosquito Research and Control Unit

G.W. Potts (Plymouth: marine ecology

Little Cayman Littoral Fishes

George R. Proctor (Kingston): botany

George R. Proctor

George R. Proctor

Little Cayman Plants Proctor 1980

Michael V. Hounsome (Manchester) land fauna other than birds and insects

THE TERRESTRIAL FAUNA (EXCLUDING BIRDS AND INSECTS) OF LITTLE CAYMAN

Little Cayman Terrestrial Fauna Hounsome

Richard R. Askew (Manchester): entomology

R. R. Askew

R. R. Askew

Little Cayman Insect fauna

Little Cayman is seldom mentioned in entomological literature. The 1938 Oxford University Biological Expedition spent thirteen days on the island and reports on the resulting collection deal with Odonata (Fraser, 1943), water-bugs (Hungerford, 1940), Nemoptera (Banks, 1941), cicadas (Davis, 1939), Carabidae (Darlington, 1947), Cerambycidae (Fisher, 1941, 1948), butterflies (Carpenter and Lewis, 1943) and Sphingidae (Jordan, 1940). During the 1975 expedition, insects of all orders were studied, over a period of about five weeks, and many additions will eventually be made to the island’s species list. At present, however, identification of the insects collected has, with the exception of the butterflies which have been considered separately, proceeded in the majority of cases as far as the family level. Application of the family names for the most part follows Borror and DeLong (1966). In this paper the general characteristics of the insect fauna are described.

Anthony W. Diamond (Nairobi): orthnithology

A. W. Diamond

A. W. Diamond

Little Cayman Birds

Ecology and species turnover of the birds of Little Cayman

1980a Atoll Research bulletin 241: 141- 164

The Red-footed Booby colony on Little Cayman; size, structure and significance

1980b Atoll Research bulletin 241: 165 -170

 

Colin Woodruffe (Cambridge): Mangroves

Colin Woodroffe

Colin Woodroffe

BE OF GOOD CHEER MY WEARY READERS, FOR I HAVE ESPIED LAND
By David R. Stoddart
Department of Geography, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

Be of Good Cheer…..by David Stoddart

Cayman Islands Natural History and Biogeography

Cayman Islands Natural History  and Biogeography

The Rarest Snail in the World

by Pat Shipman

extract:

….That’s how we learned about Cerion nanus, the rarest snail in the world. That’s a big claim for a little snail only about a centimeter long. Cerion is a common genus of air-breathing land snails in the West Indies and the Florida Keys. Different species within the genus either have no common name or are lumped together as “peanut snails” for their general shape. The most common species on Little Cayman, Cerion pannosum, is everywhere: on grasses, bushes and trees, and lying dead on the beach. The second species on Little Cayman, C. nanus, is a most uncommon snail. When we read about C. nanus in Mike Hounsome’s chapter on terrestrial invertebrates in The Cayman Islands, we were hooked. As a young man, Mike had participated in the joint Royal Society and Cayman Islands Government Expedition to Little Cayman in 1975, when the island was little known scientifically.

…Not only did Maynard conclude that Cerion nanus existed in a single, small population, he also found it almost exclusively on one plant species now known as Evolvulus squamosus. Also called the rockyplains dwarf morning glory, the species is patchily distributed on Little Cayman but also lives on many other Caribbean islands and in Florida. Maynard pronounced C. nanus “dwarfed to an extreme degree, from feeding on the pungent leaves of the plant described.” At only about half the length of C. pannosum, C. nanus seemed to compete with the larger, more ubiquitous snail.

Evolvulus sqamosus

Crab Bush – Evolvulus squamosus

Crab Bush – Evolvulus squamosus, Family: CONVOLVULACEAE, Endangered.
A knee-high, brushy shrub with minute leaves and white flowers. Little Cayman and the Bahamas.
It is the sole host of the diminutive land-snail, Cerion nanus, Critically Endangered Little Cayman endemic.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Grand Cayman (introduced from Little Cayman), June 9, 2002.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012 p.541, Pl.51.
9. Cerion nanus (Maynard) (Mollusca: CERIONIDAE) on Little Cayman

by M.V. Hounsome and R.R. Askew
http://www.doe.ky/terrestrial/animals/snails/

Butterflies of the Cayman Islands 2008 by R.R. Askew and P.A. van B. Stafford

Butterflies of the Cayman Islands 2008 by R.R. Askew and P.A. van B. Stafford

Butterflies of the Cayman Islands R.R. Askew and P.A. van B. Stafford

Butterflies of the Cayman Islands R.R. Askew and P.A. van B. Stafford

Butterflies of the Cayman Islands book
R. R. Askew and P. A. van B. Stafford
published by Apollo Books Nov. 2008, available locally at
National Trust for the Cayman Islands, Dart Family Park, South Church St, Grand Cayman – US$30.00 or CI$24.00,
and local book stores.
http://www.brill.com/butterflies-cayman-islands

FLORA of the Cayman IslandsFLORA of the CAYMAN ISLANDS by George R. Proctor, 2nd. Edition 2012,
published by Royal Botanic Gardens, KEW, was launched on Oct. 22, 2012.
The book is available for purchase, price CI$30, at the National Trust for the Cayman Islands and local bookstores.
The Cayman Islands (Grand Cayman, Little Cayman, and Cayman Brac) support 415 native taxa
in a land area little over 100 square miles, 29 of which are uniquely Caymanian.
Accessible and informative, this field guide satisfies the needs of the professional botanist,
while providing the non-expert and eco-tourist with an attractive introduction to the unique endemic flora of the Cayman Islands.
724 pages | 400 color plates, 250 line drawings | 6 x 9 1/5 | © 2012

Grand Cayman Nature Tours

Flora Gallery:

CaymANNature Flora

CaymANNature Flora_2

CaymANNature Herbarium

A Photographic Guide to the BIRDS of the CAYMAN ISLANDS by Patricia E. Bradley and Yves-Jacques Rey-Millet 2013

A Photographic Guide to the BIRDS of the CAYMAN ISLANDS
by Patricia E. Bradley and Yves-Jacques Rey-Millet 2013

Mangrove Skipper - Phocides pigmalion, R.R. Askew, Little Cayman, Jan. 23, 2008

Mangrove Skipper – Phocides pigmalion,
R.R. Askew, Little Cayman, Jan. 23, 2008

Mangrove Skipper – Phocides pigmalion batabano, Family: HESPERIIDAE nectaring on Sea Lavender – Argusia gnaphalodes Family: BORAGINACEAE.  This Mangrove Skipper subspecies is known from Andros in the Bahamas, Cuba, the Isle of Pines and Little Cayman. It has not been recorded on Grand Cayman or Cayman Brac. Photo: R.R. Askew, Little Cayman, Jan. 23, 2008. Butterflies of the Cayman Islands book, 2008 , by R. R. Askew and P. A. van B. Stafford, p.115.

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